“Artillery from unseen locations back of the line enemy’s infantry line opened upon us, and the shouts and yells from both sides were indescribably savage. It seemed like the popular idea of pandemonium made real…”
-First Lieutenant Theron W. Haight, 24th New York Infantry

Countless generals through all ages of history have penned the same thoughts on artillery– it is what wins the war.  Through the words of civil war soldiers describing the horror of being under artillery fire, we can see why this is truth,

Today, cannon placed on the battlefield provide a visual link to the violent history of this now serene landscape.  Artillery pieces on the field allow visitors to see the locations of troops beyond what a two dimensional map can offer.

Manassas National Battlefield Park currently has 40 artillery pieces displayed on the field representing various Union and Confederate battery positions in the battles of First and Second Manassas.   With the exception of two replica 10-pounder Parrott rifles, all the gun tubes are original, Civil War era pieces.  Eleven of the gun tubes are iron that need periodic maintenance (paint) to deter corrosion (rust).

Year round exposure to weather extremes and visitor traffic also takes a toll on the gun carriages placed on the field.  Original style gun carriages made of wood with metal fittings require constant maintenance and are not practical for permanent outdoor displays so the park now uses all metal (cast iron & aluminum) replicas instead.  While more resilient than wood, the older cast iron carriages still need regular maintenance to prevent corrosion (rust) and eventual structural deterioration.

The following artillery pieces are currently available for adoption:

More will be added as the park completes assessments, in order of priority.  If there is a particular cannon that you are interested in adopting that is not currently listed, or you are interested in donating a new placement, please contact cforman@manassasbattlefield.org.

No. 7 Gun, Jackson’s Line, Henry Hill

This M1841 6-pounder gun  is mounted on a No. 1 cast iron carriage in need of a complete restoration (old paint stripped, areas of corrosion cleaned, and the metal primed and repainted).  A missing prolong hook also needs to be replaced. 

Cost for restoration (carriage only):  $5,600

 

No. 8 Gun, Jackson’s Line, Henry Hill

This M1841 12-pounder field howitzer is mounted on a No. 1 cast iron carriage in need of a complete restoration (old paint stripped, areas of corrosion cleaned, and the metal primed and painted.)

Cost for restoration (carriage only):  $5,600

 

No. 2 Gun, Ricketts’ Battery, Henry Hill

This replica 10-pounder Parrott rifle made at Lorton Reformatory in the 1960s, exhibits chipped paint and severely corroded areas especially on the breechface.  Old peeling paint must be stripped and areas of corrosion cleaned before a protective primer and new finish coat of paint are applied.  The No. 1 aluminum gun carriage needs only minor paint touch up at this time.

Cost for restoration (tube only): $3,300

 

No. 4 Gun, Ricketts’ Battery, Henry Hill

The gun tube, a Confederate 10-pounder Parrott rifle made at Tredegar (Catalog # MANA 1699), was restored in 2017.  The missing cascabel knob may be wartime damage.  The cast iron No. 1 gun carriage needs a complete restoration (old paint stripped, areas of corrosion cleaned, and the metal primed and repainted).

Cost for restoration:  $5600